Mt. Graham red squirrels in the news!

MGRS_at_PHXZooArizona endangered species research and management in the news!  Check out a recent story about efforts to preserve the Mt. Graham red squirrel and how annual population estimates are generated.  This story appears in the Cronkite News, a digital media outlet offering professional journalism experience to students in Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.  See if you can catch a quote by KCRL’s leader, Dr. K in the this piece and don’t miss the associated Video Story with footage from the Phoenix Zoo’s Mt. Graham red squirrel captive breeding facility.

http://cronkitenewsonline.com/2014/10/effort-to-preserve-endangered-red-squirrel-features-annual-census-on-mount-graham/

KCRL is successfully using non-invasive methods to study and monitor San Bernardino Flying Squirrels

The Koprowsk Conservation Research Laboratory has begun a collaborative research project with the San Bernardino National Forest, CA to study San Bernardino flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus californicus), an isolated subspecies of northern flying squirrel and potential candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act.  The KCRL has successfully implemented non-invasive sampling techniques, including camera traps and hair tubes, to learn about the basic ecology of San Bernardino flying squirrels and their response to recent fire.

Trail camera images of San Bernardino flying squirrels investigating hair tubes are shown below:

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KCRL welcomes new Master’s student Amanda Veals!

The KCRL is excited to add a new Master’s student, Amanda Veals, to our group!  Amanda grew up in Phoenix, Arizona and attended the University of Arizona as an undergraduate.  She received her Bachelor’s in Science in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology with a minor in Wildlife Management. During her time as an undergrad, she worked as a college intern for the Reid Park Zoo in Tucson, Arizona and also worked in Namibia, Africa for a conservation group studying wild cats. Her true passion has always been conservation and wildlife; that is why she was so excited to accept the position back at her alma mater under Dr. Koprowski. Her work in the Koprowski lab will focus on how Mt. Graham red squirrel density and midden occupancy influences visitation and predation by mammalian predators.

Welcome aboard Amanda!!

Amanda helping her mammalogy instructor take  gray fox body measurements (photo: Tayler LaSharr)

Amanda helping her mammalogy instructor take gray fox body measurements (photo: Tayler LaSharr)

Amanda preparing to release a striped skunk caught on Sipe White Mountain Wildlife Area (photo: Sarah Schwenck)

Amanda preparing to release a striped skunk caught on Sipe White Mountain Wildlife Area (photo: Sarah Schwenck)

Amanda volunteering with AZGFD tracking Mexican wolves (photo: David Veals)

Amanda volunteering with AZGFD tracking Mexican wolves (photo: David Veals)

KCRL leader Dr. Koprowski returns to China for field work & international conference

Our Fearless leader, Dr. K, has returned to China to initiate a pilot project on small mammal abundance and diversity within the Panda Reserve Center in the Qinling Mountains. John hopes this pilot will develop into a long-term collaborative research effort between the University of Arizona and The Northwest Agricultural and Forestry University in Yangling, outside of Xi’an.  

Dr. K will then head to Zhengzhou, Henan, China to attend The 5th International Conference on Rodent Biology and Management, 25-29 August 2014. More conference details here.  

View from John's dormitory window at the base of Mt. Taibai, Qinling Mountains, China.

View from John’s dormitory window at the base of Mt. Taibai, Qinling Mountains, China.

Dr. John Koprowski heads to South Africa to initiate pilot study on small mammal seed dispersal

KCRL leader Dr. John Koprowski has arrived in South Africa to begin a pilot study assessing the potential impacts of local small mammals as seed dispersers within African savanna ecosystems.  John joins Dr. Mike Stokes from Western Kentucky University at the Balule Game Reserve, bordering Kruger National Park to begin this exciting new collaborative project.  Their preliminary research will focus on small mammal trapping coupled with analyses of seed fate and seedling herbivory.  Stay tuned for more updates!